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Tracking Student Progress

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    • ASU
      Keymaster
      #2260

      List out 2-3 ideas for skills to track with students in one of the following areas: 

      • phonemic awareness
      • phonics
      • fluency
      • vocabulary
      • comprehension
    • susan.spigelmire
      Participant
      #2991

      I use our ESGI assessment to track phonemic awareness activities. One assessment I give is onset and rime. I give the test one on one and just say words broken into onset and rime such as /c/. /at/ and the student has to tell me cat. If they have mastered that I go on to breaking words into phonemes such as /d/ /o/ /g/ and the student has to tell me dog. If they can do that then I give them a CVC word and have them read it. With the ESGI I simply mark yes and no and it generates a report for each child and for the entire class.

      • roberta.deaso
        Participant
        #3134

        Esgi is a wonderful way to keep track of student progress. It’s quick, easy, and also has the data and history you need to assess how a student is doing in moments. You can also see what your class needs as a whole, and use this information to adjust future lessons.

      • sb861
        Participant
        #3717

        I hadn’t thought to consider onset-rime as a precursor to breaking apart words into individual letter sounds, so that’s super helpful to know for assessments! I love that this program has options for advancement for students who need it.

    • roberta.deaso
      Participant
      #3132

      I use ESGI to track students progress with phonemic awareness. I give tests for rhyming, cvc words, and more to help students learn.
      I also track the sight words they are able to decode and remember with posters on the wall. As my students progress, they have a sticker that represents them and their progress added to the display. They are always excited to add more stickers. I also used this to monitor student’s letter/sound recognition in the beginning of the year. For fluency, I use bubble blowers. Lists of sight words or easy cvc words. The students is supposed to read as many as possible before running out of breath. Then they try to beat their time (or word count, more accurately).

      • sb861
        Participant
        #3716

        I love the bubble blowers idea!! That is so fun that they are practicing reading lots of words in a single breath, which will help with natural reading fluency as well!

    • karamina.mohamedeen
      Participant
      #3393

      I would track students grasp of the content using both formative and summative assessments.I really like the Phonological Awareness Chart. I teach 5th Grade and I like to use word fixes and guided word searches for vocabulary exercises. I also like to use guided reading specifically tailored to test decoding skills.

    • adsterry7
      Participant
      #3711

      My school currently uses FastBridge to track struggling students’ progress. In the class, I use whiteboard checks and read and swap activities to strengthen skills, then do a quick check while they are doing the activity.

      • fallon.trisoliere
        Participant
        #6965

        Hi, We just started using Fastbridge as well. We use it as a benchmark 3 times a year and then create progress monitoring groups based on the data. Our struggling readers need to be progress monitored at least 2 times a month. Do you put the students you progress monitor on different levels according to their reading abilities or do you add them in based on the grade level they are in? I teach 3rd grade and We noticed that the text was very similar from 2nd to 3rd grade. Also, do you have any other suggestions for use within Fastbridge? I do like the small group plans that it creates for you! I love using whiteboards for quick checks as well.

    • sb861
      Participant
      #3715

      Some skills that we have tested regarding fluency in our students is words per minute, accuracy of word recognition, and accuracy of punctuation and intonation. I have used a reading program called Read Naturally to assess and provide interventions for fluency, but this can also be assessed through a reading record with any grade-level reading passage. It helps to keep track of which words students read incorrectly and what they said instead to track patterns of errors that can be targeted later in instruction.

      • marialignos
        Participant
        #3854

        It is fun and easy to track how many words a student can read in a set period of time. I ask the student to first make a prediction, “How many words to you believe you will be able to read in 45 seconds?” I then have the student color a bar graph. One bar is the previous results, the next is the predicted amount, and the last bar is the actual amount of words they read during this assessment.

    • crirodriguez
      Participant
      #3760

      I am a Science Teacher at a Middle School for 7th Grade. I don’t really need to do this Reading Tracking, but it’s been helpful info to see how Reading Interventionists and the Primary Teachers do this.

      • sprice
        Participant
        #6833

        I feel this way also, as I teach 6th grade. However, I teach all subjects, so I can at least implement some things into my reading block!

    • jmaddox80
      Participant
      #3838

      Some of the skills that I track for fluency include the number of words the student is able to read correctly within a time frame, using expression while reading, and retelling the story/passage. I use DIBELS scores as a pre-assessment, then complete progress monitoring to help me pace the lessons I will teach in small groups with my students. I always inform my students of where they are and I have them help create a goal. We refer back to their goal when it is time to progress monitor and we update their progress. It is pretty awesome to see first graders invested in the number of words they read correctly or when they compliment each other on expression. I also provide sentence stems to encourage students to talk to each other about their reading. They use the sentence stems to provide compliments to each other and to reflect on what they are doing well and what they want to improve on. I love it when they take these sentence stems and use them with each other when working in centers.

    • marialignos
      Participant
      #3853

      For phonological awareness I have the students put their heads down on the desk. I then ask them to raise a hand only when they hear the sound we are looking for. Example: if we are studying ai long a sound they are to raise their hands when I say rain, train, plain, etc… I will also say the word cake which is a long a sound but follows the magic-e rule instead. Some students raise their hands because they hear the long a sound and some do not because they know how to spell cake. I also make a coloring game. I will put ai words, magic-e words, and other random words in boxes. I then ask them to color all the boxes that follow the ai long a sound.
      I also play a game with them for rhyming. I pair the students up. I give them a starting word. They then take turns finding words that rhyme. The winner is the one who said the last rhyming word. They take turns going first.
      The kiddos like making nonsense words by blending. I make 3 piles of cards. The first pile has digraphs, the second pile are the vowels, and the last pile contains the consonants. They take turns flipping the cards. Sometimes real words are made and sometimes they make nonsense words. The class needs to give a thumbs up or down to determine what kind of word it is, real or made up. I get a lot of giggles when we play this. I just need to make sure that all words made are school appropriate.

      • alara
        Participant
        #6857

        Non sense word activities are one of my favorite activities to see students work on, because they are learning but it can also be such a fun activity and sometimes an opportunity to be funny. Also I love the opportunity students have to use other resources to find the meaning of new words.

    • marialignos
      Participant
      #3855

      I plan on using the Phonological Awareness chart moving forward too.

    • grael
      Participant
      #4014

      Gloria Rael In my school, most of the students are special education, mostly with physical disabilities, and autism. There are only 3 classrooms with regular education. One classroom with 18 students ages 3 to 4.11 years old, there skills vary from students their first year in school to 2 or 3 years in school. These age difference and skill difference makes it hard to teach the students. When I go and help the students, I have to realize that most of the students have never been in school, and I have to start from basics- letters and sound. I try to help as much as I can with the beginning students. In addition, this school have a lot of young teachers that don’t have a lot of experience teaching. I always tell them, if you have any question, if I can guide you, I will be glad to help.

    • grael
      Participant
      #4015

      Gloria Rael I, started teaching in 1984, developmental kindergarten, at that time, it was just basics like the students needed to know 6 letters and sounds, colors, shapes, numbers 0-6, a few rhyming words, that was it. Now, the students need to know soo much in preschool, and all the other grades that I think that the late bloomers provably feel like the students can not catch their breath with soo many skills and concepts they need to know by the end of the year. As a school teacher, we now have to teach soo much for the benefit of our student. Us teachers, we need to do our best for our future students! Let’s do it!

    • ajackofallarts
      Participant
      #6747

      pre, ip, post

    • ajackofallarts
      Participant
      #6748

      Use a system that best fits for you and your students.

    • alexandra.hausman
      Participant
      #6760

      I will keep all 5 components in mind when planning my reading block: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension. Using spiral skills to consistently stay aware of students progress will help me stay on top of students who are struggling. Using my mini lessons and being consistent in collecting data will also help me plan better reading lessons for my block of time. Using diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments will also help. Keeping all of this data organized is something I continue to work on each day.

    • sprice
      Participant
      #6831

      In my 6th grad classroom, I frequently track fluency with short passages in small groups. When the student finishes reading the passage, we also discuss any new or advanced vocabulary. The students are then expected to come up with questions for the next group of students to test for comprehension. It is interesting to see what questions they come up with, as it show what information they found the most important from the passage.

      • alara
        Participant
        #6856

        I like how you are making each student or group responsible of coming up with the questions, that means that if they do not read they won’t be able to complete the assignment thus giving you a better view of who is working and also who might have trouble with reading or comprehension.

    • aperez-arce
      Participant
      #6835

      For phonological awareness assessments on
      Matching pictures to other pictures.
      Matching pictures to sound-letter patterns (graphemes)

      For phonics have letter identification assessment weekly
      Identify the letter in one min also letter sound.

    • alara
      Participant
      #6855

      Right now I am working in a Special Education classroom where all students have individual goals, although right now most of them are working on Phonics because most of them are kinder students, so I always use different types of assessments. Some of my students are not verbal so I have to use different types of material such as flashcards or magnetic letters where I ask them to touch the letter that makes such sound. All these assessments are done every week or almost everyday. I use a variety of data trackers for each of their individual goals.

    • fallon.trisoliere
      Participant
      #6966

      We currently are using Sonday daily to teach phonics instruction. I teach 3rd grade and now we have been moving into word parts and multisyllable words. Each day we review the prefixes and suffixes and then read and discuss words with these parts added to them. I can tell it is getting more difficult. We use fastbridge assessments to test their reading ability, accuracy, and fluency. Then we make small groups based on that data and work on the components of reading within those small groups. In addition, Fastbridge offers comprehension passages on each grade level. I print these and use these to practice and assess comprehension. I would like to try different assessment options such as Keep it going and My Favorite No. I currently use Popsicle Stick, Exit Tickets, and Whiteboards consistenlty.

      • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by fallon.trisoliere. Reason: added idea
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